There is an inner monologue that plays on a loop within us on a daily basis. It is our narrative, the story we have written, but never put to keyboard or paper. Our narrative forms our worldview and when they are challenged, we push back. Why? Because that narrative has guided our life, our career, and our well-being for as long as we can remember.  We have had back and forth conversations with our narrative…

You work with them individually. You work with them as a team. You put in the time and effort to teach them the good, the bad, and the ugly. You coach and mentor them through every struggle and triumph. But the team only grows when you do one thing. Step back and let them run themselves.

At some point in the mentoring process, the mentor sees the problem at hand. They realize what is holding back their mentee and what needs to be done before they move forward. It’s akin to the clicking moment that many coaches experience when someone they are working with “gets it”, in this case, it’s the mentor that has realized what the problem is. The dilemma, in this case, is a back and forth conversation that…

They say that showing up is 80% of the battle, you do that, you show up, and theoretically, no matter what you do from there, you should still be solid with your team. Perhaps as an individual, this rule applies, but as a leader, it can’t. No one needs a leader to show up and stand there, what use is one more person, standing there and not “doing” anything. If you are just “showing up”,…

When everyone thinks you are delivering something different.  It’s a good time, no it’s the best time to sit down with everyone and make sure you are all talking about the same thing. When this happens, you might be the facilitator more than anything in the conversation, not trying to push people to what you see as the delivery, but rather poking holes in what the ideas of others are (respectfully) to make sure everyone…